Diminisher or Multiplier? – Liz Wiseman

LIZ WISEMAN

LizWiseman_300

President, The Wiseman Group
Wall Street Journal Bestselling Author, Leadership and Strategy Consultant

Session 3: The Multiplier Effect

  • Former executive at Oracle Corporation, a Fortune 100 company, she held positions as Vice President of Oracle University and as the global leader for Human Resource Development for 17 years
  • President of the Wiseman Group, a Silicon Valley leadership development firm
  • Contributor to Harvard Business Review and author of the best-selling leadership strategy book, Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter
  • Liz coined the term “Multipliers” to describe leaders who amplify the intelligence of others utilizing specific practices to deliver twice the performance for their organizations

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Are you a diminisher or a multiplier?

Liz Wiseman presented the definition and the case for being a multiplying leader.  So challenging but so good!

Here are my notes:

There is more intelligence in our teams than we can see and are putting to use.

As a leader you can be a multiplier by using your intelligence to amplify and multiply the capability of people around you.  As a result, the people around you do their best work.

Diminishers:

  • Create stress.
  • Rarely ask people to solve problems they don’t know how to do.
  • Delegate small decisions.
  • Are empire builders.
  • Tyrants
  • Know-it-alls
  • Decision Makers
  • Micro-managers

Multipliers:

  • Believe people are smart and will figure it out.
  • Invite people into the space of difficulty and challenge.
  • Create owners, not hirelings.
  • Are talent managers
  • Liberators
  • Challengers
  • Debate Makers
  • Investors

Some of us are accidental diminishers – have a diminishing effect in spite of good intentions

Types of accidental diminishers:

  • The idea guy
  • Always-on
  • Rescuer
  • Pacesetter
  • Rapid Responder
  • Optimist

Liz’s book, Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter, is on the top of my reading list.  This conversation is important to our health and influence as leaders.  I encourage you to read it too!

  • Kelli Wommack

    I love the list of “accidental diminishers!” Realizing that “always being on” can have a diminishing effect is FREEING! Thanks for this… good stuff!

    • Jenni Catron

      The “accidental diminisher” list was painful!